How I’m using watchOS 3.

The long-awaited watchOS 3 update dropped last week, and it is–as promised–a marked improvement. I’m sure it’s very impressive on a Series 2 Apple Watch, but even on my Series 0 1 it’s really great. I’ve been spending some time reading the comprehensive review of the update over at MacStories, and I’ve learned a ton. As such, my usage of the Watch has changed dramatically in the past week, and I’m really enjoying this device again.

I still have many, many issues with it, in about a million ways. But the changes are largely positive and between technical adjustments and updates to the user experience, are far and away great steps for the OS to take. I have a much more optimistic outlook for the device than I did a few months back. I’ve always liked it, but let’s be realistic, it was obnoxious for a while.

Anyway, here are the two core things I’ve adjusted that make the Watch better for me on a daily basis. It’s only been a week, so this may change, but it feels solid for now.

Multiple watch faces and ease of switching

This is the most important one, and it has a lot of layers.

I use a “home” and a “work” watch face. “Home” contained an analog face (Utility), the OmniFocus and Drafts complications for capture in the upper corners, and the weather on the bottom. “Work” is a different colored Utility face, with the time in London and the temperature in the corners, and my calendar events on the bottom. Switching between these was always irritating, because so much about the Apple Watch is irritating. Well, I’m happy to report that I am no longer irritated, because a simple swipe changes faces now and I’m whistling like an idiot through my day.

Since apps whose complications appear on your watch face have memory priority, they are quicker to launch. And since the faces are super easy to switch through, I’ve added an extra Modular face in the middle of the home and work faces, solely to use as an app launcher2. So my new layout is:

Home: Activity analog face with subdials (loving this); OmniFocus upper left, Music upper right (I love using the Watch to control audio), and weather on bottom.

[swipe]

Launcher: Modular face; Reminders, large weather in center, Just Press Record, Drafts, Timer

[swipe]

Work: Todoist (work tasks, upper left), time in London upper right, calendar on bottom.

In doing this, I no longer need to keep something like Just Press Record or Drafts on my main face at all times, because they would always get triggered if one of my kids bumped into my wrist, which happens way more than you might think. And although I have weather on my home face, I don’t have it on my work face anymore, which means the current conditions and high/low temp are one swipe away at work if I want them.

That center face–just holding complications as launchers–is freaking amazing. I only use about four third party apps on the Watch at all, but having things so accessible means I literally never need to use the godforsaken honeycomb again. Having the apps launch/refresh more quickly because they’re assigned complications is icing on the cake. And if you don’t mind an additional swipe, there’s no reason you couldn’t add a second launcher face alongside with different apps.

Now Playing and the dock

One thing that sucks is that since Control Center overtook the swipe up to reveal glances (the removal of which I could not be happier about), it means that one of the parts of the Watch I used the most is harder to get to. I would be in and out of Now Playing multiple times a day, whether with podcasts or music. I totally understand the continuity between wanting Control Center to be triggered the same way, but removing the ability to control audio (which of course you can do on the iPhone/iPad) makes this less appealing. I almost never open Control Center on the Watch. I suppose now you can check your battery really quickly, but that’s never been a concern of mine anyway.

Dock apps also get priority in memory, which is good. But… if the handful of apps I need lives in complications, that means I really don’t also need them in the dock too. So I have removed everything from the dock except Now Playing (and whatever was recently used, which I have no control over), which means that while not quite as accessible as before, Now Playing is one button click and a tap away, since it’s always in position (since it’s the only thing in the dock). Not a perfect solution, but working well in spite of the questionable demotion of its position.

These two things have drastically changed how I use my Watch on a daily basis. I’m extremely tempted to go check out the Series 2 at the store, but the change even on the original Watch is incredible. It’s actually far more useful now. Add in all the other little bits, like the changes to replies in notifications for Messages, and my most frequent activities have experienced a palpable reduction of friction. Which is exactly the reason this device exists in the first place. If Apple keeps this trend going in the right direction, the Watch will quickly graduate from a “yeah it’s cool, I guess” to a “I can’t imagine going through my day without this” kind of device.

I’m excited to see where this is headed.


  1. I will not refer to my launch day Apple Watch as a Series 1, because it contains the old, busted chipset, and not the new bumped one. No, I’m not bitter. Why do you ask? (I will probably continue to be a giant infant and get a new Watch eventually, but I’ve held off for the time being.) 
  2. A bunch of people were super excited about this idea and were thanking me for being such an innovative person, but in all honesty, this idea came directly from the MacStories review. I read it and was like YES and then immediately implemented it. I let everyone know on Twitter but figured it was worth an additional footnote. So go thank Alex, because I stole it from him. 

Author: Seth Clifford

I'm here for the open bar.