Where the action is.

I’ve been steadily moving toward an iOS-only computing shift in my personal life, aided by certain bits here and there. This past weekend, after just extolling the virtues of my Air 2 and its new keyboard companion, I buckled, took the plunge, indulged my inner child, and bought myself a 12.9″ iPad Pro and Smart Keyboard. I know I’m a few months late to this party, but just allow me to say… wow.

iOS 9 is a terrific update, especially on the iPad. Paired with a keyboard, it’s as close to the hybrid device I’ve always wanted as we’ve gotten yet (although the Surface could win on a technicality, but that’s another discussion). Sure, there are things that you still can’t do (or do well) but that gap is smaller than it’s ever been. And it’s closing. And for most normal, non-edge-case stuff people do with computers, it’s tiny.

I still do some stuff on my Mac: podcasting, heavy audio recording/production tasks, certain massive file management/admin tasks. But the fact of the matter is that I don’t even open my MacBook Air most days… most weeks. Right now, it’s got a local copy of my iCloud Photo Library content, and I occasionally open up Transmit there to move giant amounts of files between destinations. But even before I got this behemoth, I was doing way more on the iPad than I ever had. Having a little more room to do it (ok, a lot more room) has been transformative.

I use a Mac every day at work. I know it inside and out. I’ve been using Macs every day since the early 90s. But that’s not where my interest is anymore. iOS is far more interesting than OS X, and that trajectory has never been clearer. The past me would have bemoaned the lack of file system access, but the me of today is grateful that security is handled by design. The lack of interoperability has been addressed, and while there’s tons of room for improvement, moving data between apps on iOS is good, and getting better. Conveniences like Touch ID and Apple Pay, solid battery life/performance, extreme portability, and fast wireless radios afford these devices a place in our lives that laptops can never take. We’ve reached a point where the thought of even carrying a second camera for most people is nonsense. Your iPhone takes incredible pictures, and things like Live Photos capture moments in ways we didn’t even realize we wanted. (Admittedly, I totally thought they were a gimmick when they were announced, and all I do now is shoot my kids for a few seconds at a time and grin like an idiot; they are absolutely one of my favorite parts of iOS.)

I have immense respect for the history of computing. I’ve grown up through what I would consider the breadth of its most important developments and most rapid advancements to date. But the thing about technology is that it never stands still, it’s always moving, evolving.

There will always be trucks, and some of us (myself included) will want and need them for certain things. But what we really all want is new bicycles. iOS and the devices that run it capture our imaginations and interest more every day. Sometimes I get anxious at the very thought of keeping up with just how quickly things are changing. But I can’t help but marvel at the incomprehensibly thin slabs of glass I carry around and smile, because we are truly living in an incredible time.

Author: Seth Clifford

I'm here for the open bar.