Putting on my big boy pants.

I started using OmniFocus about a week ago. I’d avoided it for a while because it seemed way too complicated for me, but I decided recently that while I’m able to manage my tasks and to-do items, I need to step up my game and start becoming serious about the loose ends. The goal was to finally push all the disparate buckets of capture into one meaningful place, and to more accurately gauge how well I’m doing in terms of completion. I’d just been making lists, and lists don’t exactly provide the context or the motivation I was looking for with this process.

From my cursory understanding of it, I’d always thought that the GTD mentality was overkill for what I needed. When I waited tables in college, I would remember detailed orders, from multiple people, easily. People would try to mess with me and quiz me, but as I rattled them back their orders, they quickly acquiesced. So keeping stuff in my mind has not really been a problem for me. But when I actually started to throw things into the OmniFocus inbox with the purpose of methodically clearing my head, I noticed a weird kind of comfort that came from not having to remember all those things. Some people feel overwhelmed by this process, the remembering, I never really did – but not doing it feels so much better, I wish I’d tried this earlier.

It’s taking a little while to fully embrace the entire philosophy, because I’m still finding a way to apply it to my workflows, but it’s interesting to be sure. I definitely see value in it, although I don’t know that I’d ever become a GTD zealot the way some people end up. It’s fairly complex and a lot of people don’t need this level of complexity. However, there is a certain freedom in being more serious about the lists I was previously making and applying a new level of rigor to them. I feel like I’m putting a little more pressure on myself to actually complete things by being more realistic about what I can accomplish and when I can do it. It’ll be an ongoing experiment, but I’m feeling pretty good about it.

I love finding better ways to do things. Wanna talk about it?

Author: Seth Clifford

I'm here for the open bar.